Making It Happen

I had a post ready to go this morning when a friend suggested that I continue on the subject of morality. I decided that was a good idea. When you’re rolling, why not keep rolling? First of all, some semantics. Right and wrong, and good and bad are words that denote concepts. The concept of right and wrong is nothing more than something that the majority of people agree on. Our laws are made on the idea that most people agree on what is right and wrong. That doesn’t mean however, that there is an absolute right or wrong. People often disagree on what is right or wrong. How then do we know what morality means? If you think that being rude to someone because they deserve it is being a moral person, then that’s your idea of morality. Are you right or wrong in thinking that way? The majority of people would probably say you’re wrong, that no one deserves your rudeness. Are they right or wrong? Right and wrong are often determined by the consequences of your actions. If the consequences are disagreeable, you were probably wrong. So for my purposes here, I’m going to go with the majority.

Quality is a concept that compares one thing to another. “I have a high quality TV,” usually mean a very good, expensive TV. Quality is most often used to describe things as opposed to actions, speech, or thoughts. Applying quality to ourselves relates to morality. Two books that come to mind on the subject of quality relating to people are, “Zen and the art of Motorcycle Maintenance,” by Robert M Pirsig and “The Four Agreements” by Don Miguel Ruiz. Each of these books talks about the quality of our speech, actions, and thoughts. Pirsig’s book goes into the area of metaphysics, and Ruiz’s takes a more practical approach. Both however say that we should apply quality to everything we think, do, or say.

The term “Best Life” has been thrown around a lot these days. Mostly in today’s meaning it’s applied to superficial things like lifestyle, grooming, physical appearance, material desires, etc. Self help books take up miles of shelf space in brick and mortar bookstores and the titles online are endless. But do they delve into morality? Do they explain why the quality of your speech, actions and thoughts make more difference than just about anything else?

The Dalai Lama has said, “If you cannot help someone, at least do no harm.” This hits to the core of what it means to be a moral human being. Not harming others. And by others we can include the earth, environment, animals, etc. Do no harm. It’s a simple idea, but one that’s hard to follow. It takes being self aware, of being awake in the moment. It takes being conscious of the things we think, do, and say. Most of us are so caught up in the motions of day to day living, taking care of our children, putting food on the table, going to work, that we don’t have much time to examine our motives or thoughts. But it’s important that we do. To be a moral person, to apply the concept of quality to our daily lives, we need to be conscious of it. We can’t just float through our days on automatic and expect that everything will work out. If we want to moral people, we have to make that happen.

Examining our lives to see if they follow the moral code we decide we want means taking a deeper look at who we really are. This can be troublesome. Sometimes we find that we don’t like certain aspects of ourselves. I know that I have shortcomings. And if I really want to improve my morality, my quality, I need to work on those things. When we look in the mirror we want to see the kind of person that other people like. The kind of person that others will want to be around. And not superficially, but a good and decent person that others will genuinely enjoy. This is not to say that we should become better people for the benefit of others. Although they will benefit from us being a morally decent person, we must do this for ourselves.

There are many people in the world that most of us would agree are immoral people. Greed is the culprit for most of it today. The desire for more money, or power or whatever cause people to do things most of us agree are wrong. Things that hurt others. When we act on our selfish desires most of the time it turns out bad for other people. And it turns out bad for ourselves as well because nothing in life is permanent. When we lust after money, we just want more. Power, or the control of others goes to are heads. It’s like a drug. Controlling others for our own benefit is a high that’s hard to come down from. In these cases morality goes out the window. Morality should not be something we take lightly or for convenience. It should be important enough for us to make it a priority. It can change the world.

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